How Social Media Impacts Catastrophe (INFOGRAPHIC)

Social media has quickly proven itself to be a major part of our daily lives. But going beyond a platform for networking, playing online games and taking selfies, social media has the potential to be a lifesaving tool in the event of a natural disaster. In fact, in 2013 Twitter launched an alerts system that allows users to receive notifications directly to their phones during emergencies whenever a credible organization marks a tweet as an alert.

Over the years, we’ve seen an increase in the use of social media in the wake of natural disasters. The infographic below, created by WhoIsHostingThis.com, looks at how social media has impacted recent natural disasters, including two that Crawford was significantly involved in, Superstorm Sandy and Typhoon Haiyan.

Some highlights from the visual:

  • Almost 25 percent of the general public use social media to notify family and friends about their safety.
  • Nearly 33 percent of the online population use social media to notify family and friends about their safety.
  • People may also use social media to provide current status information, or offer help to those in need.

Crawford is regularly involved in handling claims from major weather events through its CATastrophe Services (CAT), the insurance industry’s leading independent adjusting resource for claims management in response to natural and man-made disasters. These situations can also involve Crawford’s Global Technical Services℠ (GTS®) business, which operates globally and focuses on large or complex insurance losses. Read more about Crawford’s experience with storms.

Have you ever used social media during a weather event?

social media natural disasters

Source: The Drum

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